In true southern style, we will reign in the new year with some black eyed peas. For those of you who are not from the south, or have never heard of the New Year’s tradition of serving black eyed peas, eating black eyed peas on New Year’s Day is supposed to bring good luck for the year. So with New Year’s Day tomorrow, head on over to your local market to secure some black eyed peas for a tasty new tradition that the family will love.

The idea of eating black eyed peas may not sound all that appealing if you aren’t familiar with the peas. You may have tried black eyed peas in the past and didn’t really care for them. However, black eyed peas are incredibly versatile and can be served in a variety of ways that are sure to please the taste buds. Here are two kid-tested black eyed peas recipes that can bring luck and good fortune to your dinner table:

Tex Mex Black Eyed Pea Casserole

This casserole is very simple and incredibly tasty.

Ingredients:

  • A bag of prepped black eyed peas (prepared according to the package) or a can of prepared black eyed peas
  • Bacon
  • Brown long grain rice
  • A can of Rotel
  • Chopped spinach leaves
  • Cheddar Cheese
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Olive Oil

Directions:

  1. Cook the rice until almost done and dump into a casserole dish.
  2. Cook the black eyed peas per directions and bake your bacon. Bacon can be left out if you want to make this a vegetarian dish.
  3. Saute the onions and garlic in olive oil until the onions turn clear.
  4. Dump all the ingredients into the casserole dish with the rice and mix thoroughly.
  5. Top the dish with lots of cheddar cheese and place in oven. The beauty of this dish is that you can add as little or as much spinach and cheddar cheese you want.
  6. Once everything is mixed into the casserole dish, bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes.

Serve the dish with some sour cream, salsa, or guacamole to taste.

Confetti Black Eyed Peas

This recipe from Batter Up Kids is one that is appealing to the eye and the tummy.  The simple recipe contains black eyed peas, peppers, tomatoes, cheese, lime juice, and cheese served up parfait-style for the kids. What I love about Barbara’s recipe is that it takes black eyed peas and makes them visually appealing for the kids. This recipe is a perfect start to the New Year.

These recipes will introduce you to southern style black eyed peas and hopefully give you the courage to incorporate them into a New Year family tradition for years to come. Does your family eat black eyed peas on New Year, or is this tradition new to you?