As temperatures drop, electric and gas bills start to climb. While you can’t help using more energy during the cold weather, there are steps you can take to minimize your costs—and help the environment, too.

Weatherstripping

Sealing doors and windows will help keep cold air out and warm air in. You can add sheets of weatherstripping over older windows that are not airtight. Or you can buy strips that can be applied around the outside edges of the windows and doors. For a low-cost  solution to drafty doors, a draft stopper can make a big difference.

Keep Doors Closed 

It doesn’t make sense to heat rooms that you aren’t using. Closing doors to storage rooms, closets, back hallways, and unoccupied bedrooms will help keep your heat use down. Just remember to open your bedroom door a few hours before you head to bed!

Skip the Dryer

In the summer, we hang our clothes out on the line, but this isn’t as easy when the weather gets colder. Consider picking up a a drying rack or two. You can place the rack over a heating vent or next to a wood stove to dry clothes instead of tossing them into the dryer.

Furnace Care

Have your furnace inspected and cleaned before the cold season begins. A technician will be able to tell if your furnace is in the best possible condition. Furnaces that are old or poorly maintained cost more to run. You should also change your furnace filter regularly. The more freely air circulates, the lower your heating costs will be.

Smart Thermostat

You don’t need to pump the heat when everyone is in bed under layers of blankets, but we often forget to turn the heat down before bedtime. If you install a smart thermostat, you can program it to lower the heat by three to five degrees ever night at a specific time. You can also program it to boost temperatures 15 minutes before everyone gets up. You’ll be warm when you need to be while conserving energy!

Do you have tips for cutting your power bill?